Coconut Rice and Grilled Fish
wali wa nazi (coconut rice) 
samaki wa kupaka 
chai 
 
 
wali wa nazi (coconut rice) 
 
wali wa nazi (wali, cooked rice; nazi, coconut) is a swahili dish popular 
on africa's indian ocean coast, particularly in swahili areas like 
zanzibar, lamu, malindi, and mombasa. it is a creamy, rich accompaniment 
to any meat, chicken, fish, or curry. 
 
2 cup  basmati rice
4 cup  coconut milk ( two cups thick, two cups thin )
1 tsp  salt to taste
 
use rice that has been well-washed, rinsed, soaked in water for twenty 
minutes, and drained. use home-made (see below) or canned coconut milk , 
unsweetened. if using canned unsweetened coconut milk: shake the can 
before opening. divide the contents of the can into two parts, placing 
about two-thirds of the can's contents in one measuring cup and the 
remaining one-third in the other. add enough warm water to each to make 
two cups. the first is the "thick", the second is the "thin". add salt to 
taste. 
 
bring the thin coconut milk to a near boil in a saucepan. add the rice and 
salt. cook for about ten minutes, stirring constantly. reduce heat to very 
low. stir in the thick coconut milk. continue stirring for five minutes 
while the mixture simmers. cover tightly. make sure the fire is as low as 
possible. let steam for twenty to twenty-five minutes. serve with samaki 
wa kupaka, or tanzanian meat stew, mchuzi wa samaki or any swahili-style 
curry dish. 
 
home - made coconut milk: coconut milk is made from the meat of the 
ripened coconut. to make thick coconut milk: in a glass bowl, combine 
equal parts near-boiling water and coconut meat (fresh or dried, shredded 
or flaked -- if using packaged coconut meat, unsweetened). stir well and 
allow the mixture to stand for up to an hour. squeeze the mixture very 
tightly in your hands, or run it through a blender or food processor. 
strain everything through a cheesecloth, using the cloth to wring all 
liquid from the coconut meat. repeat the process, re-using the same 
coconut meat to make thin coconut milk, then throw away the coconut meat. 
 
 
 
 
samaki wa kupaka 
 
this tasty fish recipe is best if it's done on a charcoal grill, but it's 
quite good if done in the oven broiler. 
 
1   whole ngege ( tilapia )
2 tsp  fresh ginger
6 clove  of garlic
2   zambezi red chile peppers
3 cup  coconut milk (canned is okay )
  a little tamarind paste or powder to taste
1 tsp  curry powder
  salt (to taste)
  cayenne pepper (to taste)
 
clean fish, remove scales and tail. cut a long gash on each side of the 
fish. grind together the ginger, garlic, and chile pepper, and salt until 
it forms a paste. rub this mixture all over the fish, into the stomach 
cavity, and into the gash on each side. cover and leave to sit for an hour 
or two. in a saucepan stir together the coconut milk, tamarind, curry 
powder, salt and cayenne pepper. simmer the sauce over a low heat. place 
the fish on an outdoor grill (a metal grill basket with a hinged top is 
very useful); or cook the fish in the oven broiler. when fish is half done 
begin spooning the sauce over the fish. spoon more of the sauce onto the 
fish each time you turn it. if using the broiler you might transfer the 
fish to the oven. continue cooking until fish is done. drink chai with the 
meal or afterwards. 
 
 
 
chai 
 
chai is the word for tea throughout the middle east, western asia, and in 
swahili-speaking eastern africa. to make chai it is essential to follow 
the indian custom that all the ingredients be brought to a boil together. 
doing so gives chai a different taste and feel than would be obtained by 
just adding milk and spices to hot tea. 
 
4 cup  milk
4 cup  water
4 tsp  keemun or yunanthree black tea
1/4 tsp  whole cardamon seeds or few pinches of ground cardamom
1 pinch  ground ginger
  sugar to taste
 
in a saucepan combine all ingredients. add the spices: cardamom seeds (or 
a few pinches of ground cardamom) and just a pinch of ginger should be 
enough spice. bring mixture to a low boil and simmer for a few minutes. 
pour the tea through a strainer into a teapot and serve immediately. 
 
without the ginger this recipe also works well for coffee. 
 
 
-- 
old magic 1 
 
 
-- 
(ID: 3363) Mirror: rec.food.recipes: Wed, Mar 2, 2005


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